September 2018: This glossary is being moved over from another web host. Under construction.

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ

A (back to top)

accidic
acosmic
adminicle
Aesopical
aggiornamento
agnates
aigrette
agonistic
Aldershottian
alpenglow
altermondialist
altricial
ambarvalia
amigados
amortize
anakalypteria
analphabetism
andirons
anexelegktos
anfractuosity
animadversion
anosognosia
antimacassar
antipeponthos
apocatastasis
apostrophize
archaism
argot
astrakhan

accidic (back to top)

noun. A sociopath. From accidie (sloth, laziness, apathy, despair)

“The accidic is an ‘outsider’ who is completely detached from both the ‘positive’ and ‘negative’ sides of the value continuum.”
Criminologist S. Giora Shoham. Quoted in Kathleen Norris. Acedia & Me: A Marriage, Monks, and a Writer’s Life. New York: Riverhead Books, 2008. p. 119.

acosmic (back to top)

Transcending the world.

“The way of a sannyasi or a sannyasini (nun) in India is an acosmic path — that is, not of this world. It transcends the values, attachments, and obligations of worldly existence.”
Wayne Teasdale. A Monk in the World: Cultivating a Spiritual Life. Novato, Calif.: New World Library, 2002. p. xxii.

adminicle (back to top)

In Scots law: A document giving evidence as to the existence or contents of another, missing document.

“But happily for the investor, forgery is an affair of practice….the floor bare, the sofa heaped with books and accounts enveloped in a dirty table-cloth, the pens rusted, the paper glazed with a thick film of dust; and yet these were but adminicles of misery, and the true root of his depression lay round him on the table in the shape of misbegotten forgeries.”
Robert Louis Stevenson and Lloyd Osbourne. The Wrong Box. (1889) London: Pan Books, 1966. pp. 72-73.

Aesopical (back to top)
Meaning uncertain.

“The Black, or Negro-Eunuchs, are appointed to guard the Apartment of the Women, and they make choice, for that office, of the most deform’d and most Aesopical, that can be found.”

Jean-Baptiste Tavernier, quoted in Peter Tompkins. The Eunuch and the Virgin: A Study of Curious Customs. New York: Bramhall House, 1962. p 49.

aggiornamento (back to top)

Daily living for monks and nuns.

"In the jargon of aggiornamento, asceticism can hardly class as an ‘in’ word."
Donald L. Gelpi, S.J. Functional Asceticism: A Guideline for American Religious. New York: Sheed and Ward, 1966. p. 15.

agnates (back to top)

“The honor of a group of agnates is collective, and all assume full and equal responsibility for violently avenging any dishonor to any of them, whether it results from insult, injury, or homicide, or fornication or adultery with a wife, sister, or mother (Barth, 1965: 81–6, 137).”

Alan Page Fiske and Tage Shakti Rai. Virtuous Violence: Hurting and Killing to Create, Sustain, End, and Honor Social Relationships. Cambridge University Press, 2014.

agonistic (back to top)

“At the same time, the communal guest–host bond is the complement and reflection of the agonistic relations among all men in honor cultures: every man is potential guest and host to every other honorable man.”

Alan Page Fiske and Tage Shakti Rai. Virtuous Violence: Hurting and Killing to Create, Sustain, End, and Honor Social Relationships. Cambridge University Press, 2014.

aigrette (back to top)

”Thwarted in this, she hurried to fasten the aigrette set with diamonds and its three rust brown pheasant feathers over an unsightly bulge of fabric in the turban’s center front.”
Ann Chamberlin. The Sultan’s Daughter. New York: Forge, 1997. pp. 103-104.

Aldershottian (back to top)

Aldershottian

"In reactionary Russia in our own century a woman soldier organized an effective regiment of amazons, which disappeared only because it was Aldershottian enough to be against the Revolution."
George Bernard Shaw, in his 1924 Preface to Saint Joan. New York: Penguin Books, Inc., 1946. p. 17.

alpenglow (back to top)

“When the first beams of sunlight hit the snow-covered mountains of Colorado each morning, the reflection of the sun’s rays turns the white snow pink. This hue is called alpenglow, and it is a beautiful sight to behold.”

Brian Luke Seaward. Stand Like Mountain, Flow Like Water: Reflections on Stress and Human Spirituality. (1997) Deerfield Beach, Fla.: Health Communications, Inc. 2007. p. 299.

B (back to top)

baetylia
bamboozle
banth
bazuco
beeves
befurbelowed
beslubbered
betel quids
bezoar
BFO
bibelot
bibliolatry
blackguardly scurrility
black world
bolmakissie
bombyx
bonzeling
borborygms
bovaryism
Brobdignagian
brogrammer
brutiful
bumf
bumptious
bureaucracy
burke

C (back to top)

cabalistic flapdoodle
cacique
caique
cairngorn
calaboosed
calibanism
caparisoned
capercailzie
captious
cardiognosis
carissime
carminative
carom
casque
catafalque
cathect
cavaillons
ceiled
chaleur
chamfered
chantey
chapfallen
charmylopi
charpoy
chemolithoautotrophic
cheshbon nefesh
chimerical
churl
clitpenoid
clusterfrack
cocotte
coffle
compassarium
concordat
condign
confab
conscientization
conspicuous austerity
contumelious
cooee
coracle
cosmomorphism
cottabus
counterworld
cowboy up
crapulous
critter
cryoprotection
cuckold
cucurbit
cunya
curragh
cynic spasm
cynocertain
cytoarchitectonic

D (back to top)

damne
dalmatica
defixion
degel shachor
deliquesce
demosclerosis
desoufflage
desquamation
dietrologia
dight
disintegrating babelic prism
disordered philological oddments
displacement activities
dissentient
dolmen
draggletail
dreadnaught
drinkitite
dropsical
drouth
duded up
duumvirate
dystopian simulacrum

E (back to top)

ecdysiastically
echolalia
edentulous
egoic
ekpyrotic
electuary
eleemosynary
elixir
enceinte
encomiastic
endopsychic automatism
endovelate
enfeoff
enflesh
ensorcel
entelechy
Ephialtes
eppur si muove
equipoise
espadrilles
eternullity
ethicokabbalistic
etiolated
euhemerized
euphrasie
exinanition
ezelbruggetjes

F (back to top)

fanfaron
farl
farouche
fata morgana
fenrissonr
feridjie
Fernweh
fescennine
filotimo
fingerspitzengefuehl
finical
fissiparous
fitra
flâcherie
flagitious
flamigerous
flapdoodle
flinders
flâneur
flense
floccinaucinihilipilification
flophouse
foolscap
forelock-tugger
froideur
frowardness
frowzy
frühvollendet
furze

fussbudgetry

fylffots

G (back to top)

galenical
galboy
gasmantel
gazofilacio
gastrulate
gay
gegu
Gelassenheit
gentilezza
gerontocracy
gestetnered
gibbous
gimbals
gleet
gloomth
gluggavedur
gnomic
goddam
goffered
gormless
goudou-goudou
greaves
gueridon
guyed

H (back to top)

haboob
Hackordnung
hallux
harridan
haruspicy
haskalah
haversack
heartwood
henna gaijin
hexateuchal
hilla-ridden
hipster
hornbook
humilific
hure
hyperdelic
hypertrophy

I (back to top)

iataxqhana
idiographic
idoneous
Ijtihad
imaginal
immanensity
indigenous pyrophilia
ineffable bosh
inglenook
inouï
involucre
ipsedixitism
irredentist
irrefragable
irremediable smash
irruption
isolatoes

irredentist (back to top)

“States could therefore exploit the threat from the living dead to acquire new territory, squelch irredentist movements, settle old scores, or subdue enduring rivals.”

Daniel W. Drezner. Theories of International Politics and Zombies: Revived Edition. Princeton University Press, 2014.

J (back to top)

Jamahiriya
janeite
jatismara
jet d’eau
juche

K (back to top)

kamptulicon
kantaoming
karass
katagelasticism
kelleh minar
khevisberi
kirtle
kompromat
kova tembel

L (back to top)

Laodicean
latifundum
leman
lettered gentility
liget
lickerish
logomachy
logotherapy
lorgnette
lothario
loup-garou
lupanar
lych-gate

M (back to top)

macadamised
macaronic
Machtstaat
magical thinking
Maginot Line
marl
mantic
man-woman hour
mara
marabout
megrim
mesalliance
methylated
microhistory
misprision
mithridate
moil
monoclinous
monomania
monozukuri
moot
mopery
mother-naked
mortsafe
mulct
muntu
myrmidon
mythologeme
mythoscape

N (back to top)

naivasha
narcostate
nea-con
neuroenteric
neurtue
niblick
nigrescent
nizam
nouement d’aiguillette

nomophobia
nonmootness
nonoil
nowism
nuncupative
nurdled

O (back to top)

omerta
omniincompetence
omphaloskepsis
onto-axiological
opacous
opsimath
orfling
oriel
orison
orotund
orrery
ostrich complex
overstand

P (back to top)

palaver
panchreston
papyromania
papyrophobe
parachronism
paraenesis
paralinguistics
parapraxes
paravanes
pawl
percussive sublimation
petrific
pettifoggery
pharyngealised
philosophaster
phrontisterion
phugoid
pillion
pilniewinks
pleonexia
poco-curantism
poltoonery
polymath
pongee
prayopaveshan
precipitevolissimevolmente
predella
prescind
prestidigitatory
promnesia
pronoia
propaedeutics
propheteia
protoplasmic
pseudocyesis
psychomachia
puerility
punctilio
purfled
pyrolatry
pyrophoric

Q (back to top)

quiddity
quisling

R (back to top)

rachmones
raddled
rarebit
rebetika
red kisses
religiofication
repristinate
resident genius
res odiosae
revanchist
rhodomontade
rhothios
rigor cartis
rimbaugh
riverine
roisterer
roozmaregi

S (back to top)

Sabbath gasbag
saccade
salariat
samizdat
sanctibullying
sanguinolent
sapid
sartori
satyagraha
saudade
savonon
saxaul
scalene
scathe
scrump
sdvig
semiliterate famulus
semibarbarous
sempiternal
sexsomnia
sfumato
sgriob
shaffafiyya
shagreen
sham
shambolic
shekkeh
shefakat
shoganai
shrasp
shtarker
simarre
simon-pure
sinecure
sirenomelia
siroc
sirreverence
six sigma
skua-bitten
slainthe
sluttish
snuffling gabble
somatophobia
souterrain
sozzled
spandrel
spatulate
spinet
spiritus fermenti
spoor
stanchion
stelionnat
stentorian
stertorious
stridulation
stupidaggine
suborn
sudoku
suicism
suffumigation
superannuated
superbity
supercinnabar
sutler
swan upping
swivet
synallagmatic
synecdoche
synod unbenign
syntagma

T (back to top)

tabac
tachisme
taikonaut
talatat
tarradiddle
tatterdemalion
tekelteh
telluric
tenterhooks
termagant
tertium quid
Teufelskreis
thakat
thaumaturge
theophorous
theotropic
threnody
Thymotic
tollenone
topoanalysis
totefolio
towzled
treacertains
truckle
turpiloquium
tyro

U (back to top)

uitlander
ukase
undercroft
unkickability
unshriven
unsquopped
upstander
uranography

V (back to top)

vaivode
vambraces
vardonic
velleities
vertiginous
veve
vexatious
villatic
Vitamin W
voxel

W (back to top)

weltschmerz
whoonga
wordfact

weltschmerz (back to top)

“Try to believe you want him here because of what he unwittingly demonstrates when he says he can’t choose between Rice Krispies and Cheerios. What he’s showing you must be weltschmerz: the knowledge that physical reality can never satisfy the demands of the mind.

“To Do List for Morning.” Stephen Ira. Printed in The Collection, ed. by Tom. Léger and Riley MacLeod. New York: Topside Press, 2012. p. 239.

whoonga (back to top)

“…armed gangsters [in South Africa] have begun raiding AIDS clinics and mugging patients to steal the ARV medication, Stocrin. Together with cannabis, rat poison and some other ingredients, it is being used to make a lethal new drug, known as whoonga or wunga. Selling for just 15-35 rand a dose to give you a high, it is spreading like wildfire through the black townships. Just two puffs are said to get you hooked.”

“Getting to grips.” The Economist. Dec. 4, 2010. p. 60.

wordfact (back to top)

The process of how language shapes our perception and ultimately the truth itself.

“There is a danger, however, in the language of symbols, for once words become removed from things, they begin to shape their own reality. John Kenneth Galbraith calls this phenomenon ‘wordfact.’ An excellent illustration is the story of the Emperor’s New Clothes.”
Donna Woolfolk Cross. Word Abuse: How the words we use use us. New York: Coward, McCann and Geoghegan, Inc. 1979. p. 30.

X (back to top)

xeroxlore
xoogler

xeroxlore (back to top)

Rumors spread by photocopying.

“The howlers [among urban legends], it turns out, are examples of a subgenre called xeroxlore. The employee who posts one of these lists admits that he did not compile the items himself but took them from a list someone gave him, which were taken from another list, which excerpted letters that someone in some office somewhere really did receive.”
Steven Pinker. The Language Instinct: How the Mind Creates Language. (1994) New York: HarperPerennial, 1995. p. 388.

xoogler (back to top)

“But his complaint resonates with some Xooglers (the nickname for former Google employees), who say decision-making has become painfully slow as the firm has grown.”

“How long will Google’s magic last?” Economist. Dec. 4, 2010. p. 78.

Y (back to top)

yclept
(back to top)
yoga
(back to top)

yclept (back to top)

Named.

“This mighty monster had a son yclept Sharrkan…”
Richard F. Burton, ed. and trans. The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night: A Plain and Literal Translation of the Arabian Nights Entertainments. New York: The Limited Editions Club, 1934. Vol 1. “King Omar bin al-Nu’uman and his Sons Sharrkan and Zau al-Makan.” p 520.

yoga (back to top)

An Eastern spiritual practice of stretching and breathing. From the Sanskrit meaning “to join together.”

“And since each degree of change in the heavenly bodies creates a new frequency of energy, the [Jyotish] astrologer must memorize several thousand individual patterns between any two or three planets–these arrangements are called yogas, literally the ‘yoking’ of stars. * * * In ancient India this closing of the gap was described as yoga or union (the same Sanskrit root gave us the verb ‘to yoke’).”
Deepak Chopra. How To Know God: The Soul’s Journey into the Mystery of Mysteries. New York: Harmony Books, 2000. p 264-265, 290.

Z (back to top)

zamburek
zamindar
zar
zareba
zenkey

zamburek (back to top)

“It wore an appearance partaking more of the character of a military expedition than one purely for pleasure; particularly as in the collected crowd were to be seen a body of two hundred camels, called Zamburek, each bearing a small swivel gun on its back, which were fired as the royal foot touched the royal stirrup. * * * As he approached his own horse, he found the astrologer royal ready with his watch to give him the true time for touching his foot with the stirrup, and then by the assistance of his Shatir Bashi, who placed his hand under his arm, he vaulted into the saddle. At that moment, the discharge of the two hundred swivels from the camel artillery was heard, the great band of the nokara, consisting of drums, and cymbals, and hautbois began to play, and there was a shout of laudatory exclamations and prayers from those around.”
James Morier. Zohrab, the Hostage. London: Richard Bentley, New Burlington Street, 1832. Vol. I, pp. 32-33, 34.

zamindar (back to top)

”Still inclined to favor the Muslim way of doing things, Maryam held that it made no difference if you were the daughter of a feudal zamindar or an illiterate Punjabi peasant; every patient at the Paagal Khanaah was treated with kindness.”

Deborah Baker. The Convert: A Tale of Exile and Extremism. Minneapolis: Graywolf Press, 2011. p. 129-130.

zar (back to top)

“Most Ethiopians, including the Beta-Israel, believe in the cult of the zar, a personal spirit that may be male or female, is usually malevolent, and causes terrible disease or other misfortune — most often to women between the ages of fifteen and thirty. The shamans who deal with zars and other spirits are called balazar, master of the zar.

Louis Rapoport. The Lost Jews: Last of the Ethiopian Falashas. New York: Stein and Day, 1980. p. 172.

zareba (back to top)

“Reared in a land where to-morrow is the busiest day of the week, he distrusts bustle, and, lest by an oversight he should be forced to hurry, he has erected a strict zareba of red-tape through which he gazes with a stony, departmental attention to business.”

Julian Duguid. Green Hell. London: George Newnes, 1935. p. 23.

zenkey (back to top)

A hybrid between a donkey mother and zebra father. In 2003, the only living zenkey was at Nasu Safari Park north of Tokyo.